Mark Mars
3rd December 2018 - 2 mins read
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f you like a Facebook post there are more than 4 million people doing the same thing at the same time.  As you are reading this blog, there are another 1,400 being published at the same time competing for attention.

These are staggering statistics and show the huge challenges organisations face in getting heard above all the competition.

So just how can you stand out from all this noise?

The key is to offer something different which shows your brand has a unique voice.

At Thirty Seven, we believe journalists play the crucial role in making this happen.

Here are 10 reasons why we think they produce the best content:

 

  • Journalists are natural researchers, able to translate and deliver engaging information to a mass audience.

  • Journalists are skilled at gathering and filtering huge quantities of information, rejecting what’s superfluous and getting to the heart of a story.

  • Journalists have a sixth sense for spotting new stories and fresh angles to really bring a piece of copy to life.

  • Those who work in the media are driven by a hunger for current affairs, trends and talking points and are able to use this insight to respond quickly, providing content which is topical and relevant across a range of industries.

  • Journalists are experts at presenting information in a clear, compelling way and telling authentic, researched stories that persuades readers to think, feel or do something.

  • Journalists are skilled at interviewing, with the ability to empathise with people and specialists at all levels. They have the knowledge and experience to ask the questions that really cut to the chase.

  • Journalists are not daunted by a lack of knowledge in specialist areas. They are inquisitive and able to interpret information with original thinking and honest appraisal.

  • A story is wasted if nobody reads it. Journalists know how to create attention grabbing, killer headlines that compel the reader to find out more.

  • Journalists can self-edit and have the ability to adapt and reuse content for different channels – a crucial skill in maximising the impact and life of content.

  • Journalists are relentless in hitting deadlines. After all, in the media, if a story isn’t filed on time it doesn’t make the paper or news bulletin.

 

At Thirty Seven, we offer content and design services to ensure your campaigns reach the right audiences at the right times. Our journalist led approach ensures your content is interesting, engaging and informative so you gain brand awareness and engagement whether it is a podcast or email marketing.

Marketing

Will GDPR prove a catalyst for improving content quality?

Adam Fisher 29th January 2018 — 3 mins read
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f course, the regulations, which are supposed to improve data protection for EU citizens, residents and businesses, do have significant implications for brands and the way they communicate with their customers.

But is there another side to the doom, gloom and scaremongering?

Well, at Thirty Seven we believe the changes, which come into force on May 25, present an opportunity for marketers and could be a catalyst for good.

Before the rise of the internet it was very hard for brands to produce content, at least cost effectively.

But as the World Wide Web has gone from strength to strength it has become ever easier for organisations to reach customers.

However, this has come at a cost, because while content marketing has been enjoying a boom, there is little doubt it has been at the expense of quality. There’s now less craft and more churn in the majority of content and all too often what customers receive offers little in the way of value.

Of course what exactly constitutes ‘quality’ content is subjective, vague and elusive. However, Google uses a definition which I believe works as well as any.

Its evaluators use the EAT acronym when ranking website pages. It stands for Expertise, Authoritativeness and Trustworthiness and we believe it is a good model to adopt to ensure content stays ahead of the pack.

So how will GDPR impact the quality of content? Well, by giving people more control of their data they will also have more control of what information they receive.

Brands need to be able to show that consent to receive their information has been “freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous” – ideally this should be achieved through a double opt-in procedure involving a signup process, such as clicking a box, and a confirmation of that instruction by clicking a link in a follow-up email.

Businesses will also have to make it easy for that consent to be withdrawn at any time.

This means that, particularly in the days after the May deadline, many brands will have fewer people on their mailing lists. While there will still be those who argue that size matters, it is surely better to have a more concise list of people who look forward to receiving your content than a larger list of people who are indifferent and don’t really know how or why your emails end up in their inbox.

More importantly, it also means brands will have to work harder than ever to get people to subscribe and sign-up and continue to be happy to receive their content.

And that in turn means content needs to be better quality, targeted, personalised, niche and valuable. In short, content that turns recipients into fans.

Of course, it is possible that some email marketeers will try to duck these regulations or convince themselves that only the really big players will be targeted by GDPR enforcers in the early days, but the risks of non-compliance are eye-watering; a fine which is either four per cent of turnover or €20 million - whichever is the larger.

Another possibility is that organisations may simply reduce their email marketing activity as they struggle to comply with the GDPR May deadline and turn to social media more instead to fill the vacuum.

But to make that approach work they will still need to place greater emphasis on the quality of their social media output, because if customers are going to engage with that content they will again need to feel it has value and is worth sharing.

We are not suggesting that GDPR is going to improve the quality of the internet, but it will give the content you receive in your mailbox a much needed shot in the arm.

 

At Thirty Seven, we offer content and design services to ensure your campaigns reach the right audiences at the right times. Our journalist led approach ensures your content is interesting, engaging and informative so you gain brand awareness and engagement whether it is social media content or a whitepaper.

Graham Jones
19th February 2018 - 5 mins read

Every company wants to be an authority in their sector - those that engage the media usually are

Media First designs and delivers bespoke media and communications courses that use current working journalists, along with PR and communications professionals, to help you get the most from your communications plan.